. s

Stories Page 31

The Weather

Today—Partly cloudy, chance of scat- tered showers in morning and turning cooler in afternoon. High about 82. Fair and cooler at night and Thursday. Tuesday's temperatures: High, 87 at 3:20 p. m.; low, 70 at 7 a. m. Pollen count—40. (Details on Page 20.)

Times Herald

Chisox Take First as Yanks Lose nashington

Jost FINAL

*

78th Year No. 269

Phone RE. 7-1234 ene walbztatyd

os

WEDNESDAY, A

) Compent

UGUST 31, 195

5

WTOP Radio (1500) TV (Ch. 9)

FIVE CENTS

RED A

FOR ARABS HINTED

Senate Unit Accused of ‘Kid-Glove’ Risk Probe

Chairman Johnston Denies Allegations

Shigemitsu

Hints at U.S. l or Foolproof Data Exchange

Departure

Japanese Official

Says Time Has Come To Review Joint Defense Plans

Disarmament Recommendations

Stassen Calls on Soviet Union

By Francis W. Carpenter

UNITED NATIONS, WN. Y. Aug. 30 #—President Fisen- hower's disarmament envoy to- day called for a foolproof ex-

change of military blueprints ~~

and aerial inspections between

ithe United States and Russia.

hower'’s plan, but later prom- ised to study it.

Stassen's move was another step by the United States in- tended to obtain U. N. approv- al for the Eisenhower plan

Romania Announces

cern that President Eisenhow- ers plan may have loopholes through which a surprise at- tack o eat proportions might be wgleashed

Here are the main points. put forward by Stassen to prevert such a development:

“Each nation has recognized the need for ground observers

Aid Offer ;

By Russia Is Reported | To Dulles

U. 5S. Urges Israel And Her Neighbors

To Refrain From Any Use of Force

Je Will Cut Its Army

Romania, following the propaganda tead of Russia and Crechosiovakia, an-

By Americans for By Warren Unna

Fiall Reporter

Japanese Foreign Minister

The plan would set up safe- ‘guarcs against Pearl Harbor- type attacks.

The delegate, Harold E. Stas-

and these will be stationed at'| key locations within the other! country for the purpose of al-' lowing them to certify the

Democratic Action

By Murrey Marder Biatt

Reporter

A charge that “kid-glove” tactics are being used in the Senate investigation of the! Federal security program was made yesterday by Americans for Democratic Action. It was promptly de-| nied |

Joseph Le Rauh Jr. national chairman of ADA, told a Sern ate Civil Service Subcommit-| tee’ it was Only “shadow-box-| , ing” with its promises to make an all-out inquiry.

Rauh said “a kid-gloved and polite investigation of a few horrible examples does, a present from the greater harm than no investi-; -———--——-— gation at all. It will serve to whitewash the ‘num- bers racket and all of the out- rages of Nixon-MeCarthy .poli- tics.”

Chairman Olin D. Johnston’ (D-S.C.), bristling at the attack. said the Subcommittee is doing everytitiag within its power to get at “the facts.” die challenged Rauh to pro dure the facts or “tell us how i> get them.” . Rauh.said hed be glad to suggest that

Johnston said he that testimony already heard) has knocked the ground from| under Republican claims about’ Area residents pushed their the program made in the last gifts to the disaster-stricken

litieal campaign. Staff mem-' northeastern states over the aa <_< pag mae $120,000 mark yesterday—an senhower Administration § in —Te BGG per cent of the

$75,000 they were asked to give See SECURITY, Page 9, Col. l only last week.

| “This remarkable response, spontaneous and strictly by mail, is no mere token of sym- pathy.” said Daniel W. Beil, chairman of the District Chap- ter of the American Red Cross, the organization which is :on-

e

Fund 5

To 160.4 Pet.

Area’s $75,000 Quota Oversubecribed With

believes $120.000 in a Week

(Pecture on Page 2)

Girl in Span Leap Rescued, Revived

Artificial respiration by- a Metropolitan Sabreman revived ;Aucting the appeal. an unconscious 19-year-old gir!) Bell said the volume of mail last night after shé@-eppareptiy being received by the District jumped 75 feet from the South chapter, as well as by chapters Capito! st, bridge into the Ana-|'" the suburban areas, points costia River. to a possible contributions to-

Motorcycle Pvt. C. EF. Fones|*#* of $150,000 said the girl, Miss Juanita Car-| The national ter, 1121 2d st. se. “was not breathing” when he began giv- other $100,000 at 10 a. m. today ing her artificial respiration. [when the government of the

Police said Miss Carter was|Dominican Republic turns over Brought to shore shortly before|to Red Cross officials a check midnfght by a man who identi-|for $100,000. The check will be fied himself as John E. Smith, in addition to $100,000 given a 31. of 1010 20th st. nw., whoifew days ago by Generalissir.o dove trom the riverbank and/Rafael Trujillo, former presi- swam to her aid dent of thegation.

Fones,:off duty and en route. The Dipti Chapter reported home. stopped and revived Miss its largest single contribution Carter. of the day yesterday from em-

ployes of the Labor Depart- ment. The gift totaled $2789.50

\ gift of $1280 was recorded from Capitol Cadillac(Oldsmo- | bile Co.. Suburban Cadillac- ‘Oldsmobile Co. and Akers ‘Oldsmobile-Cadillac Co. and employes

Gifts may District Red 2025 § st in Alexandria, Arlington, Fair- fax, Montgomery and Prince | Georges.

fund, mean-

>

Farm Prices Drop Another 2 Pct.

Tnited Prees

Farm prices dropped 2 per cent during the month ended August 15 to a level 6 per cent below last year's figure, the Ag- riculture Department said yes terday.

During the same period, the

be mailed to the Cross Chapter,

Gloria Lockerman, 12, champion Baltimore speller, decided net te try the $32,000 question. The dictionary she holds is TV program. (Other photes, Page 23.)

merely | |

Flood Relief |

rs |

while, will be increased by an-|

nw., or to chapters!

‘Shigemitsu yesterday hinted ‘that his country might like to see an end to American ‘troops on Japanese soil. | Shigemitsu'’s carefully ‘couched remark at a National Press Club luncheon was the first reference to such an action | by a high-placed Japanese of- ficial, although the subject has been bandied about previously in Japans Diet

The Foreign Minister alse his country’s i'Prime Minister, simultaneously | made reference to “territories rightfully ours, which await res- titution.” Thie-Was intérpreted as meaning that Japan was eve ing the return of such prewar territories as the Bonin and the |Ryukyu Islands, including Oki- inawa, which are occupied by

who is

Associated Prees

ithe Kuriles, Habomeis and Shikotan, which are occupied by Russia. ) | The 6&yearold diplomat said the territorial restitution, plus! the repatriation of 210 Japanese war criminals, “are two owt-) standing issues that so far Rave consumed much time” in his talks with Secretary of State John , oster Dulles Dulles was asked about the withdrawal of American troops from Japan at his press con Lockerman, 12- ference yesterday morning but yegr-old. “cpell-belle” from Bal. deferred answering the ) ground that Shige ght timore, settled for the $)6,090 bring up the fect withjhim| she had already won last nigh®’ that very da} in New. ‘* and passed up the \ few hours later at™jhe Shigemitsu think the time

Girl Speller tops After $16,000 Win

Gloria Plays It Safe. Refuses to Try for $32,000

Gihoria the

$32,000 hurdle to the “$64,000 Press Club, Question.” clared: “I When Hal March, quiz mas ter on the Columbia Broadcast- ing System's fabuloMielevision show, asked Glorjé’s grand moth Mrs. Bertha Key, if she had 5 whether would try for the $32.000 Key replied deliberate!s “Yes I think I have. I think the Lord has been very. very good to Gloria and I decided that she would stop here.” Gloria then presented with two checks—one for §15,- 500 that will be put into a trust ‘fund for her and another check for $500 for Gloria to spend “on lollipops, or anything in the world you March told the smiling, self-possessed liathe Négro gir! The

of Gloria's

tries should review our de- fense relationship and put |! on a solid partnership basis P We “should coordinate plans and establish goals for our common defense so that we may rapidly put an end to continued reliance on A

r our national

(lor ia Mrs

we have not ex hausted our agenuity to find ways and means of elaborat ing. to our mutual satisfaction, a system of defense, based on mutuality, that will prove ade quate and, at the same time, eliminate such frictions as are botind to arise from the pres- ence of foreign troops on. our soil.”

It was the last part of this statement which caught the eve of local Far Gast experts. The United States now main-

See JAPAN, Page 7, Col, 1

‘Edith’ 640 Miles Below Cape Race

was

want.”

Governments tax bite

out winnings will amount to approximately $4640 If she had taken the mext step and the $32.000. Sam's cut would have amounted to approximately $11,910. Gloria, who will be a-ninth- grade student at the Booker T.| ported last night about 640 Washington High School in| miles south southwest of Cape! Baltimore this fall, also was| Race. Newfoundland. moving! given a television set. a bicycle, narth-northeast about 20 miles ' See GLORIA, Pg. 2, Col.2 ‘an hour.

won Linele

Asoociated Presa

Hurricane Edith Was._re

eee

cost of production and living)! supplies purchased by farmers declined one per cent.

Einsteinium and Fermium

i -_

Washington's Most Complete Financial Pages Offer You:

As Result of

By Rennie Taylor BERKELEY, Calif... Aug. 30 #—The first full-scale hydro-

ati sobs ; a |gen bomb explosion in the Pa- hnimee crint ne make auote., |tifie in the late 1952 produced arger pr ° ry a two new chemical elements, One Caey 0 (see atomic scienists disclosed to- day.

The researchers recommend- ed the new elements be named lafter the late Dr. Albert Ein- stein and the late Dr. Enrico Fermi, who played leading roles in the birth of the atomic age. Such recommendations usually are accepted.”

The new elements are Num- ber 98 in the roster of the chemical substances, to be named einsteinium, and Num- ber 100, to be called fermium.

Their detection and identifi-

: Any

Washington 's N. Y. Stock Exchange table.

cromoiete

Most comprehensive local, na- tional and world business news by leading authorities.

Complete record of the day's transactions including clos- ings, in all editions, on all markets covered by this news- paper.

See Pages 27, 28 and 29. For Home Delivery, Phone REpublic 7-1234

Elements No. 99 and 100 Discovered

52 Pacific H-Bomb Blast

cation were announced by vari- ous researchers in February. 1954, but circumstances of the \discoveries were not made pub- sion which uses Uranium 235 lic. jor plutonium for fuel. | | Results of cooperative ex-| The join letter of the re-! 'periments which yielded the searchers suggests the 1952) new elements were described|' bomb consisted of a core of | jin a joint letter to the ‘editor| Uranium 235 or plutonium, | ‘of the Physical Review by three. groups—the University of California radiation labora- tory and two Atomic Energy Commission laboratories, the Argonne near Chicago and Los

for atom smashing. They are produced in large numbers in an ordinary atom bomb explo-'

an ad- ranium

some form, and finall dition of ordinary 238.

The two new élements, first detected in the Pacific blast, Alamos, N. M. ' were produced later in the

Both new elements, the an-| laboratories and were chem- nouncement said, were pro-jically identified and classified. duced by the bombardment of The confirmatory work was ordinary, Uranium 238 with|done with a cyclotron here, neutrons. Neutrons are sub-' with an atomic reactor at Arco. atomic particles and are the Idaho, and in the Los Alamos ,most effective kind of bullets! atom laboratory. -

f h

ithe United States: and Sakhalin. |

j

then a jocket of hydrogen in| A'sop

tatreria!s

sen, nade the recommendations to the UL. N. Disarmament Sub comniittee now in session Stassen, who has carried on a study of this proposal for months, suggested the safe guards would assure the United States and Russia against sur-

try

There was no immediate re action from the Russians At the summit conference in Ge. neva. the Russians at fret were

prise attack from either coun.) a A

slightly cool toward Mr. Eisen-' deputy; ss. at

nounced yesterday it will cut back its army by 40,000 men by Dec. 1. Page 4.

al

»

eee

United States Chief Delegate Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. urged the Subcommittee to approve it yesterday.

The Geneva spirit of cordial ity carried on today as the dele- gates got down to basic prin ciples in their search for a dis- armament program.

There has been some con

40 From U.S.

Held as Korea

Tax Hosta ges

Forbidden to Leave

Till Companies Pay |

*Exorbrant’ Levies

SEOUT.. Aug. 2 m—The Am Chamber of Cam. merece in Korea complained to day that 49 American husinessmen are being held as government for failing to pay “greatly exorbitant” taxes

One businessman charged the Seoul goverhment refused to allow him to fly to Hoggkong

see hig new-born child until

n

approximately

hostages” by the

to nae, paid his back business taxes now come when our two ef

The Chamber sent cables to the United States Chamber of Commerce in Washington and the National Foreign Trade Council in New York urging them to file the “strongest protest.”

urgent

The cables charged that “an. ‘a d

proximately 49 members are held as individual hostages for their porations.” The Cham. ber AL government “arbi- trarilxs has imposed exorbitant taxes which were “assessed with caprice.”

It was charged also that cor- poration taxes,are demanded) from individual representatives who are in Korea only as liaison men.

H. E. Renfro, of Louisville, Ky., said he received a cable yesterday from his wife in Hongkong announcing the birth of their child. He was denied an exit permit to fly there be- cause he failed to pay taxes he considers excessive, Renfro charged "

He said his firm. the Ameri can Trading Co.. of New York. has agreed to send another rep resentative to Seoul, so he can go to Hongkong

The Chamber said American businessman was refused "an exit under similar

permit

accuracy of the forégoing in- formation (information dealing with military installations) and to give warning of evidence of surprise attack or of mobiliza tion

“Each country shall permit unrestricted, but monitored, aerial reconnaissance by visval, photographic and electronic means by the other country

“The United Statés and the USSR, will exchange all data

‘Bee ARMS, Page 9, Col. 1

Bearing Melts On Forrestal; Test Run Cut

ABOARD CARRIER FOR RESTAL A propeller-shaft bearing melt- ed today and forced curtail- ment of sea trials of the super-

carrier Forrestal.

The trouble developed in the’

main thrust bearing on the No 3 shaft as the world's biggest warship was building up to full power about 100 miles east of Cane Henry. Va

H. T. Bent. vice president

and works manager of the For-

restal’'s builders. the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., said the melted bear- ing would prevent full-power runs, planned for Wednesday. For this reason, the ship. which sailed from Newport News, Va. yesterday, will re- turn there Thursday morning instead of Friday, as originally scheduled The Forrestal will return to sea Sept. 19 to perform the postponed full-power runs, Ben!

! are “We still hone to deliver the ship to the Navy on Sept. 29, as scheduled.” Bent said. Com- mresiening ceremonies are scheduled for Oct. 1.

The Forrestal, proceeding on her remaining three shafts at speeds of 15 to 20 knots, will undergo all scheduled tests to- night and Wednesday except those requiring full power

ATl hands among the 2300 per- sons ard had been eagerly awaiting the full-power speed tests of this giant $200 million

op. Secretary of the Navy Charles S Thomas has said the Forres-

tal would attain a speed of 40 miles an hour,

2 Are Saved In Boat Mishap

Catholic University

Egypt Agrees

To Cease-Fire

Tn (,aza Area

U. N. Truce Plans Accepted; Reply Of Israel Awaited

(Picture on Page 17) JERUSALEM (Wednesday). Aug 21 WeThe United WNa- ti¢ns Truce Mission announced last night Egypt has agreed to a cease-fire on the Israeli- Egyptian from near Gaza. Israel's decision is expected to- day, it said The cease-fire was to become effective at 6 p. m. Jerusalem time (1 p. m. EDT).

The crackle of gunfire and the roars of wther explosive violence went on through - terday.

4 U. N. spokesman, indicct- ing optimism that the fighting

AT SEA, Aug. 30

~s.

‘may end shortly, said a cease- 6

fire proposa both Egypt and Isra y Mai Gen. E. L. M. Burns, chief truce supervisor for Palestine

Egypt, he said, had respond. éd positively, and Israel's re- ply was expected shortly.

The Egyptian government in-

en sent to

Egypt accepted the proposal.

An American delegation spokesman at the U. N. head- quarters in New York read the Cairo report and said “we hope this means an end of ti shoot- ing in thie Gaza area.”

The American and. British

| Ambassadors at Cairo called on ithe Foreign Ministry and urged

An Israeli spokesman charged early today

spokesman con-

By Edward T. Folliard

BSiall Reporter

Secretary of State John Foster Dulles said yesterday there have been indirect but reliable reports that Russia has offered weapons of war to the Arab countries.

He said that if the reports were true. the United States wouldn't be very happy, since such a development would not contribute to the easing of ‘world tension promised at the Big Four meeting in Geneva.

But Dulles acknowledged at a news conference that he had no official information that Rus- ‘sia had offered arms tt the Ara countries, end no evidence that such equipment was in Arab hands. He said that since they were independent coun- tries, they were free to do what they wished in acquiring war materia! | The Secretary said the United States had urged both Israe) and. Egypt within the last 48 hours to refrain from use of force in their besder dis- pute, hoping to head off a full- scale war. He said that this country’s next move will de- pend on the reaction of Israel and Egypt to its. peace-making efforts.

Other observations of Dulles at his news conference were:

® Vice President Richard M. Nixon has no intention of visit- ing Moscow this fall during his ‘good-will trip to the Middle

ast.

>

® The question of a treaty under which American forces would be withdrawn from Ja pan has not vet been raised in his talks with Japanese For- eign Minister Mamoru Shige- mitsu, but might come up later. © The State Department éx- pects to ask Congress for more money for maintenance of American embassies. If Rep. Pat Hillings (R-Calif.), thinks our embassy in Moscow is a

‘formation’ department had an- P's pen,” he ought to see the ‘nounced earlier last night that

leaky embassy in Laos, where the plumbing is out of order and the only available water ‘overruns the floors. * | © German Chancellor Kon-

‘red Adenauer’s visit to Moscow ‘ought to prove useful, especial- ly in view of an enlarged agenda under which German unification and the ‘return of

Wang Ping-nan, nvoy. But each nearer the time when Red China will release

day brings

circumstances were rescued from the Poto-|firmed that shooting went on the 41 American civilians it

was Alvin J. Milnick, of Beverly mac River last night when their| along the Gaza strip armistice |holds, and patience is called

Hills, Calif. He wanted to visit

days. Another businessman said he received a $239,000 tax state-

ment, covering a period from|

sailboat capsized 100

yards| demarcation line. An Israeli for. his wife in Tokyo for a few from the Buzzard Point Boat ' spokesman late last night con-|

© The truce inspection teams

Yard at the foot of Ist st. sw. |tradicted earlier Israeli state-\in Korea no longer serve a

Police identified the pair as Carl H. Lippold and Jackie Dawson. A high wind caused

‘ments and said

|

e day had been quiet there.

Confirm e d/reports said

useful purpose. The teams, made up of Swedish, Swiss, Polish and Czech members,

Sept. 14, 1954. to June 30, 1955,\the 14foot snipe to overturn) heavy shelling agross the line should either be dissolved or

and including a 10 per centiand crash inta a buoy, police Monday

fine for negligence in payment.

chamber sources said if pre- sent taxing methods continue they will recommend with-

said. The students clung to

the boat until rescued.

and Tuesday

night Ss and wounded

killed five Je nine.

‘simply get their reports from inside the demilitarized zone \between Free and Red Korea,

= os -_ ee

ov

drawal of all foreign business Noq Occasion to Use It in 38 Years

men from South Korea

Informed quarters said United States Embasay officials met today with South Korean! tax Officials to discuss the com- plaints.

Index

Page |

je 15 | Horoscope . Ain’sem'‘ts 24,25 | Keeping Well. Childs ......14 | Kilgalien .... Classified. 38-45 | Livingston Comics ., 56-59 | Movie Guide Crossword ..56 | Night Clubs . vistrict Line. 58 | Ovituaries Dixon. ..15 | Parsons 14 | Pearson Events ay.146 | Picture Page. rederal. Diary 19 | Radio-TV Firancial .27-29 | S |

Page

o¢4 @-

Herblock. Weather

x

Dulles Reveals License to Carry Gun,

Fingerprinting Every Year to Keep It

He said he has come to re nal conclusion, and that thé

International News Service Secretary of State John Foster Dulles, s to promote peace, disclosed yesterday he is licensed to carry a gun.

| Dulles disclosed his owner- ‘ship of the revolver in illustrat- whose main job ing that being fingerprinted, in international, the American point of view, ‘does ngt carry @ stigma,

He conceded some foreign

But the Cabinet officer smil-| countries fingerprint only crimi- ingly said that in the 38 years| nals, and that some aliens feel

he has owned a revolver, he stigmatized if they are finger.. . ‘printed. He said consideration

se

has never had eccasion to u t .

Dulles also reported he cheer- fully undergoes Saeeterieting every year to obtain a lega license for the, weapon,

is being given officially to ask-

‘ing Congress to rescind the law

that requires visitors to the

Waited States to be finger-

printed.

“*

fi {fnal conctus topic probably will be discussed at the October meeting of foreign ministers in Geneva inasmuch as Soviet Russia has expressed displeas ure over the requirement. 3 Dulles said the. American viewpoint is that fingerprin is the one infallible means identification, and that United States officials a fingerprinted as a matter routine.

THE WASHINGTON POST ond TIMES HERALD rd Wednesdoy, August 31, 1958

etee

FHA Studies Backing

United Press

For Flood Insurance

From the Ocean Floor

Melvin E. Scott, 22-year-old

sunken ship armed with brass cannon off Solano Beach, Calif., holds a ring he said he took from the wreckage. A

jeweler told him it was a black

By Robert F. Morison ~-

The Federal Housing Admin- istration announced yesterday it is spearheading a move to) work out some form of Govern-) men insurance to pre vent disastrous financial losses, due to

FHA Commissioner Norman P. Mason said the need for some such insurafice was brought home when it became clear that most of the esti- mated ~ billion flood damage in N astern states was not lcovered by insurance.

Mason noted that the private insurance industry claims it icannot undertake such insur- ance because the risk cannot be spread widely enough to sus- tain claim payments in hard- hit flood areas.

“There is a glaring need for some type of protection, and the problems are such that this seems to be a field in which the Government must take the initiative,” Mason said.

He said at special committee

Phil Platt,

Off to Help Flood Victims

ably assisted by daughters Diane, 6, (left) and Linda, 8, loads up a trailer outside his White House Cleaners, 1312 Rhode Island ave. ne., for the trip te

JOHANNESBURG, (‘#—Two books by United States authors have been banned b

2 U. S, Books Banned _ | }ing Noel, first published in 1951 30 jane now appearing in cheaper

“My Days of

y* Anger,” by James T. Farrell. ‘South African censors. . They No reasons were given for the are “I Killed Stalin,” by Ster- order.

Aug.

edition, and

By Arthur Ellis. Staff Photographer

Cromwell, Conn., where the American Le- gion will distribute to flood victims the un- claimed clothing, linens, laundry and shoe. (Stery on Page 1.)

has been set up by FHA and already is at work on plans and ideas to prespnt to confer- ences soon with industry and Goternment officials. | Mason suggested several pos. sibiliti such Government-| : Sacked Sood insurance. One) By Marvin L. Arrowsmith method, he said, might follow | DENVER, Aug. 30 #—Presi- the pattern of the present Gov"! sont Bissnhower today bonded

ernment crop insurance pro) : gram which &. shown a sur-/Out another $25 million for

plus in recent years. flood relief. And the Adminis-

Another, he said, would be : to pattern flood insurance after; @ton arranged a Washing a wartime plan that brought/t0n conference for Wednesday more than 500 private casuaity|on rehabilitation of the water- companies into a program co-\ravaged northeastern regions. ordinated by the War Damage; The President allocated ini- Insurance Corp. \tial grants of $1 million each to

“Government re-insurance | Connecticut and Massachusetts.

—€ the loss >, ee in| and $500,000 to New York for surees is one possible Me approaching this problem,” Ma.| repair of damage. He previous- son said. “We shall explore every ave- nue in our search for a way to prevent the devastating losses suffered by so many Americans in this latest catastrophe.”

Mason did not indicate whether he hopes to have a flood insurance program ready for the 1956 legislative session.

Internationa! News

skin diver whe reported a

sapphire, worth $500 to $800.

Settlement Reunites Pair ‘2282.rnte

Separated by

CHICAGO, Aug. 30 7 An indignant housewife and her striking husband are together again today. '

rs. Esther Quigley, 35, was|Fan American World Airways

reunited with her husband, An-

:

drew, a 220-pound steward for working hours.

the CIO United Auto Workers Union, last night after nearly a’ week of dispute.

» that the reunion re-) sulte “no kissing, no hug- ging, no tears, no nothing.”

Mrs. Quigley had loudly op-|

posed the strike of Local 1214|Roard stepped into the dispute out that they will have sizable of the CIO-UAW at the Harri-| sunday, however, ahd as long payments to make on

son Sheet Steel Co. During the,

work stoppage, she had barred #* it is engaged in seeking a

Andrew from their home.

She contended the strike was fllegal because the union con- tract had not expired when the workers struck.

A wnion spokesman said the membership, consisting of 350 of the company’s 450 em- ployes, yesterday unanimously approved a contract agreement reached Saturday with the com- pany

Mrs. Quigley said she was happy about the settlement and had been awaiting Andrew’s re- turn.

“Andy is a good guy and I! hope we can get back to nor- mal,” she said.

Mrs. Quigley added that her husband did not want to talk to anyone. |

Chrysler Negotiators |

Hope to Avert Strike

DETROIT, Aug 30 ® United Auto Workers (CIO) megotiators appeared hopeful today they can reach a new eontract settiement with Chrysler Corp. in time avert a strike by 139,000 em-

oyes at midnight Wednes-

ay.

Emil Mazey, UAW secretary- treasurer who has been in on the talks since they started last June 27, admitted that both sides still had “a long way to go” before reaching complete agreement. But meetings are still in progress.

Adding optimism was an ap- parent willingness on the part of the company to take up a UAW demand that unionized office workers be covered by guaranteed wage provisions.

Virtual agreement has been reached on the “guaranteed semi-annual wage" plan for lant workers. The plan, sim-

r to those contained in the) Ford and General Motors con-' tracts last June, guarantees plant workers up to 65 per cent of their take-home pay: during 26 weeks of layoffs. | Airline Union Votes | To Authorize Strike

NEW YORK, Aug. 30 The CIO Transport Workers

ee oe + a gee = ee ee ee

4221 Connecticut Avenue

Union announced today thatiary to provide some form of members whelmingly to strike against) ,occes against financial losses

negotiating commitee to call Mrs. Quigley told newsmen, 4 strike any time after the provide coverage against earth- current contract expires mid-| quakes, night Wednesday.

‘settlement a sthike would be tunnels. jewelry, furs and some illegal under the Railway La. personal property. But the ma-

bor Act.

since Aug. 16, the union wants an 18-cent hourly pay increase for hourly-rated employes, and ‘a $45 monthly boost fof flight

pursers.

ceive an average of $2.10 an

‘which

1955 PONTIAC Star Coupe Catalina Hardtop

*2535 |

Hyd. P. Steering, P. Brakes; All leather Int., 124 inch, Low miles—New Car Guarantee. _

FLOOD. PONTI.

v

Several members of Congress have expressed interest in such

suffered by persons who lost their homes and belongings in ‘the recent Northeastern floods. | Sen. Herbert H. Lehman (D- iN Y.) has announced he will introduce legislation in Janu-

Auto Strike

Government igsurance to pro-

oes mteas both individuals and busi-|-

voted

from floods, drought or atomic explosions.

Tne insurance industry . em- phasized after the recent floods the that it has not found a way to insyre against flood disgsters ‘although it has been ate to

for higher pay and shorter

The action empowers

hurri- “other

windstorms, ‘canes, lightning and challenges of nature.”

The Federal Mediation’ j.austry spokesmen pointed

| such automobiles, mer-

things as transit, bridges.

chandise in

\ijor damage to homes, furniture ‘and other “real property” was not eligible for insurance from floods and is a dead loss to the owners.

Mason said the flood field “is one field where the insurance companies and the Government working together can really be of service to the average Amer- ican home owner.”

He said that while some may call flood insurance unwork- able. “the least we can do for American families facing such overpowering loss in the future to explore every possible ‘means of protection.”

In negotiations under way

including and

employes, stewardesses

service stewards,

The flight service group now receives $375 a month., Mem- bers of the other group re-

hour. . —S.

GLORIA—From P. I

Gloria Stops at $16,000

a tape recorder and a year’s\roundly applauded by a sur-| subscription to the “Little Lu prised, but sympathetic studio! Lu” comic book. audience in New York. | Glorig last week whipped; Gloria had said a few days’ through a tonguetwiKing Se€N- seo she intended t try all the tence to win $16,000 by ling for th 000 | every word jn the sentence: “2Y for the $64, question. | “The belligerent astigmatic @/0r!@ left it Bp to her ¢-and-| anthropologist annihilgted in-| mother, with whom She lives. | numerable chrysanthemums.”: |/*¢F parents are divorced and) As a television audience|'Ve in Philadelphia. | estimated at over 45 million), contestant on the show’! viewers waited tensely to see| "4S tried for $64,000 since it) whether Gloria would try to/9€#@n_ in June, but two have double her winnings, Gloria| WO" $32,000 and stopped there chatted calmly with March. A_ Marine captain, Richard She said she had been a guest|MecCutehen of Worthington, at the State Fair of West Vir-|Obio, passed the $16,000 mark ginia during the past week and//ast night by correctly giving) had been asked to sav “just| the geographical origin and the one word” antidisestablish-|flour used in five varieties of mentarianism—the word she|>read named by Quizmaster spelled on August 16 to win'March. He'll debate for a week . over whether to try for the If Gloria had attempted to try | $32,000 question next Tuesday for $32,000 and missed last| might in his category: food and night,.she would have won a cooking. ;

Rev. Vivian T. Key, pastor of | the Orchard Street Methodist

Vegetables ond Fruits. .. ot the peck of

consolation prize of $4000,' ie also would have been held.in trust for her. | Gloria’s grandfather, the THE SECRET of the Popularity of Church in Baltimore, was in) the audience when Mrs. Key. | OUR SALADS! gave the decision that was| ats: We use only FRESH ovor... rushed to us while they're still brim- ming with healtful vitamins.

Perfectly Air-Conditioned _ RESTAURANTS

14th St. at New York Ave. H.W. FREE DINNER PARKING 6 P.M. lo 1AM, at Capital Garage, oppesite Longchamps

; . ; 6-8400 :

S wo.

$2.5 Million Added for Flood Relief

for Pennsylvania, New Jersey|from the Army, Corps of Engi-

and Rhode Island. To spur the rehabilitation | Finance

neers, the Housing and Home ney, the Small' ij

|program, which may cost more | Business A

than $100 million, the Adminis-| Budget Bureau, the tration called a conference of | Defense Mobilization, and the key officials at the White House

The Army Engineers Corps ||)ij) be represented by one of his | reported to ne President, |)! top aides, Wilton Persons. \meanwhile, that it ‘now has he- | jij) _At the conference, in addi-|habilitation projects under way ii tion to Persons, will be Val Pe-|in 64 communities——11 more’! MN terson, Civil Defense Adminis-|than yesterday in the six/| iii

trator and chief of the rehabili-/ northeastern states which were |i _

tation program, and officials’ hit by floods.

proving once again that People

Well done all of you who gave to the urgent a financial aid in helping our neighbors in the Northeast States who were rav- aged by rain and floods.

Auntie Sccutity

& TRUST COMPANY

Daniel W, Bell, President and Chairman of the Board

15th St. aid Pennsylvania Ave. N.W. Washington, DB. ¢.

THE BASIC HAT WITH NARROW BRIM

Increased interest is being shown in our basic hat in narrow brim widths. Cavanagh continues to make this fa- voured hat in five graduated proportions of brim and crown.

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Accurate fitting assured by: Regular Long Ovals Ovals $40

15 Agents for Hickey-Freeman Clothes and Bronzini Neckwear

GOLDHEIMS

1409 H STREET EST. 1875

Wide Extra Long Ovals

Ovals

9990 ~=— «$30

God bless YOU!

..« Mr. and Mrs. Greater Washington, for

help People!

. » « YOU who sent your check for the flood relief fund to your local Red Cross Chapter.

. » » YOU who stopped into a bank and gave your bill or coins to a teller. . » » YOU who gave when someone came to your office for a donation.

. } » YOU boys and girls who in your own childish way raised funds by having bazaars, pet shows and the like. eae

., » YOU the business people, who so quickly made substantial contributions.

al of the Red Cross for

It’s human nature for all of us to compete against each other in our endeavor to make our own way in this land of free enterprise. But let tragedy or disaster strike . . . competition is gone and in its stead, in the true Ameri- can way of life, is a united front of helping those in need.

The funds you have contributed will. help the Red Cross to supply food, clothing, shelter, medical and other supplies so badly needed by these victims of disaster.

Mr. and Mrs. Greater Washington, you have in this great hour of need come to the aid of your fellow man... People helping People.

Member: Federal Deposit ineurenes Corp, —Member Federal Reserve System | * | , wr : >

a ~~

THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES sae , Wednesday, Aiegust 31, 1955

Judge Settles Tiff of Boss And Bus Boy

An altercation between a 17- yearold busboy and his boss yesterday led to the loss of his job and his temporary arrest.

The youth, employed at